Negotiating Skills

Negotiating Skills

John Curtis’s Negotiation Skills training provides strategic frameworks for understanding negotiation and covers the communication skills needed to be effective.

Learn More About Negotiation Training with John Curtis

Is Loss Aversion Keeping You From Realizing Gains in Negotiations?

John Curtis, .

While a fallen hero, Lance Armstrong perfectly describes the theory of loss aversion: “I like to win, but more than anything, I can’t stand this idea of losing.” The pleasure we derive from winning is not as great as the pain we feel from losing, so we act to minimize and avoid loss. This can impede our ability to make rational, unbiased decisions. Why? How can we start to focus on the gains?

Importance of Face-to-Face Interactions

John Curtis, .

How many Facebook friends do you have? 200? 500? 1,000? Now, how many “real” friends do you have? Cornell researchers found that we have an average of two confidants. Two. We run the same risk in our professional lives: email, instant messages, texts…all of this makes it easier to communicate – but also harder. Face-to-face communication is not obsolete; in fact, it is, in many ways, more important than ever.

3 Easy Ways to Improve Your Communication Skills Today

John Curtis, .

The youngest infants are able to communicate their needs and wants – for food, for comfort, for warmth. And they do so quite effectively!  Ironically, that as our ability to express ourselves increases, so too does the chance of misinterpretation and misunderstanding. The purpose of communication is to relay our message to another person clearly and unambiguously. Babies are wonderful at this; when they scream and suck at their hand, we know just what they’re “talking” about. It’s the adults that have problems; the process of communication is often muddled, interrupted, or obscured, and this can lead to conflict. It can feel like one big session of that game we played as kids – Broken Telephone.

What is BATNA – and When Do You Use It?

John Curtis, .

Say you need to purchase materials for your business from a supplier; it’s an emergency – you needed these supplies yesterday, and you cannot wait for tomorrow. When you go to the supplier, he sees that you are in trouble. And seeing this, he knows he can charge you a premium for the materials. Now, what if, instead, you went to three or four suppliers who could meet your needs and budget? When the first supplier knows this, suddenly he is a lot more reasonable in his prices.

Why? BATNA.

5 Reasons to Strive for Win-Win Negotiations

John Curtis, .

The idea of zero-sum games is that every gain is offset by loss: there is a winner and a loser. When something takes, something else has to give. This is the mindset into which many people enter negotiations: “If I win, he loses. If he wins, I lose.” But life isn’t a zero-sum game, and negotiation doesn’t have to be either. Maybe some games have to have a loser; but win-win negotiations do not.

Technically, a win-win negotiation refers not to the specific process, but the destination.  Usually, these sorts of outcomes are made more likely by an “interest based” approach but this is not absolutely necessary.

Negotiation Skill #1: Ask for What you Want!

John Curtis, .

Go get a gym membership for less than the advertised price. You have the power. Tell them you’re shopping around for the best price; tell them you want the initial fee or membership fee waived or the monthly fee reduced. Say no to the first offer. Everyone in that gym pays a different price; there is no reason why yours should be the highest. We can negotiate everything from car prices to cosmetic surgery. The biggest barrier for most people – the reason why they won’t dicker with the gym, the salesman, or the boss – is that they don’t know how to ask for what they want. If you can get over that barrier, you can discover an important source of negotiating power.